The Title 1 Program is a federally funded program that offers us the opportunity to schedule additional reading time and activities to students needing supplemental assistance in Language Arts.

Our focus is individualized to address specific needs of the child in the areas of phonetics, language arts, writing, comprehension and fluency. For us to insure each child is successful, we need to ask for the parents and child’s help!

The link identified will access a School Parent Compact for those who are currently participating in the Title 1 Program defining the responsibilities expected from the School Personnel, the Parent and the Child.

Please access the compact by clicking on the link, read it as a family so you can discuss it and agree to commit to the responsibilities. The parent and the student must sign the printed compact and return Ms Havick by the end of October. If you are unable to print the document you can find copies at the front desk.

We strive to improve reading for every child! Readers become Leaders!

 


 

Download Compact – Title 1 Parent School Compact Agreement

 


 

Therapy Dog Reading Program  – Release And Waiver

 


 

What is Title 1?

Title 1 is… a service offered through federal allocated funds for schools classified as low income for the purpose of assisting students school-wide to demonstrate proficiency related to the state’s academic standards.

What academic areas are covered?  The federal funds can support supplemental educational services primarily in Reading/Language Arts and Mathematics.  DMA prioritized Reading/Language Arts as the critical focus area.

What else can these funds be used for?   These monies can also support professional development for the teachers and provide supplies and materials to enhance the program.

How is the amount of money the federal government provides to DMA determined?  As each family completes admission forms, they are asked to complete a free/reduced lunch application to determine eligibility.   A Charter School must have at least 10 low income students to qualify for funding.   Although the funding is determined by the number of low income students enrolled in the school, the services are offered to students at-risk schoolwide.

How does the school determine who receives the supplemental services from Title 1?  The Title 1 services are offered to the students who are identified as those ‘most at risk’ to achieve state academic standards.   This means a student may be reading one or more grade levels below where he/she should be reading.  This is determined by using the standardized assessment tools to include SAGE, DIBELS, SRA and STAR as well as the teacher’s class observation of the students performance.  Our focus is to provide services to those in the greatest need.

How often and where are these services delivered?  The Title 1 Staff meets as often as feasible based on the number of participants.   The time invested in each child is a minimum of 15 minutes, daily but can be as long as 30-45 minutes in a group setting.   We are very flexible in meeting the individual’s needs so the Title 1 services may be more effective for the child if we work with them in the Title 1 room.   We will not remove a child from a teacher instructed lesson and will adjust our schedules to come back after the lesson is completed.  

Who works with Title 1 students?   Each classroom has a Teacher Assistant that works with Title 1 students dedicating an hour and half focused on reading and language arts.   The assessments help identify the critical needs of each student so that the Assistance can individualize instruction.   In addition, the Title 1 team assist students who may have specials needs outside of the classroom.

What type of activities are done with Title 1 students?   The activities are always directed to meet the individual’s needs and to supplement the classroom activities.  Our goal is to make reading fun!  We talk with each student to identify what they are interested in so that we can spend time reading in their interest area .   If someone likes what they do, they want to learn more and they usually do it well.   Some teaching examples include basic phonics, letter recognition, spelling, sentence structure, reading for comprehension, and reading fluency.  You might find us playing scrabble, drawing pictures of the story that we read, making sentences from scrambled words or writing a play.

Does the Teacher know who the students are who receive Title 1 services and do they know what Title 1 is doing with their students?

Yes, the teachers are an integral part of identifying and recommending the students to receive Title 1 services.   The Teacher, Teacher Assistants and the Title 1 team work together to insure we are focused on offering supplemental practice in the needed skill area(s).

Will the parent be notified if their child has been identified to receive Title 1 services?  Yes, it is the Parent’s Right to Know when your child is receiving additional services from the school.   A letter will be sent to you and you will be asked, along with your child, to sign a School Parent Contract.  The Title 1 Team will also invite you to a Title 1 meeting to discuss the program and offer you ideas on how you can assist in helping  insure your child is successful.

What is a School Parent Compact?  This is a team commitment from you, the parent/guardian, student, teacher/teacher assistant and the school director that identifies each of the team’s responsibility that will assist in providing the right environment to improve the students reading abilities.  This is a signed document by all involved and placed in the Title 1 file.  Let’s commit today!

What can a Title 1 parent do to help their child be successful?

Commit to the responsibilities that the School Parent Compact define for student success!   Success is based on the support of everyone on the team, that includes teachers, teacher assistants, Title 1 staff and you!  Have your child read out loud, write sentences about what he/she read, draw pictures from the story read, listen to audio books, tell you about what they read.  Listen, ask questions, encourage and stay involved!